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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 1:41 pm 
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This is my second post on this subject after reading what everyone has to say. I still think the title is disgraceful -- no matter what in the end the song is meant to be, the title is disrespectful. Should never have played on the air -- should never have been anything that someone running for RNC chair wants to be associated with.

Having said that, Mike Huckabee cannot -- and should not -- be responsible for everything everyone else says and does -- Lord knows, he has enough responsibility for the things he says. He supported Don Young. Many, many, many supporters on this board disagreed with his decision -- but he held true and did not step away.

Anything Mike were to say will be dissected -- and misstated -- by too many. Maybe some of you will be satisfied -- but the total effect will be completely damaging to him -- in a very unfair way. I guess in the end I am too selfish. I want him to be our next candidate -- I want him to have every chance. I think he has enough battles to fight on his own -- he does not need to force himself into the ring where so few else (who do not have a personal stake in this matter) have tread. He endorsed Chip -- because as a manger he saw the good he can bring to the RNC. And that good, I am sure, still remains. He does not endorse every stupid thing Chip does -- anything he says at this point will come back to HIM -- as it always does -- not to Chip.

You have all been around long enough. You all know how he his comments are always distorted. So while I originally thought he should speak up, I now believe he should do what he thinks is correct -- and that includes -- whether we like it or not -- politically.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 1:55 pm 
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I nearly died when I saw this on CNN this morning. Chip's response to just whine about the media having a double standard is irrelevant. I hated doing it, but I officially pulled my endorsement of Chip on my blog. I just couldn't find any way to spin this stupid decision (the CD). I am sick and disappointed.

I had hoped that Chip had carried Gov. Huckabee's belief in vertical politics with him, but I see he has not.

Michael Steele won't be a bad choice. It just cannot be Michigan's Saul Anuzi. It sure won't be Chip Saltsman.

http://onemom.wordpress.com/2008/12/29/ ... dorsement/

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 2:06 pm 
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Mike Huckabee cannot -- and should not -- be responsible for everything everyone else says and does -- Lord knows, he has enough responsibility for the things he says. He supported Don Young. Many, many, many supporters on this board disagreed with his decision -- but he held true and did not step away.

Anything Mike were to say will be dissected -- and misstated -- by too many. Maybe some of you will be satisfied -- but the total effect will be completely damaging to him -- in a very unfair way. I guess in the end I am too selfish. I want him to be our next candidate -- I want him to have every chance. I think he has enough battles to fight on his own -- he does not need to force himself into the ring where so few else (who do not have a personal stake in this matter) have tread. He endorsed Chip -- because as a manger he saw the good he can bring to the RNC. And that good, I am sure, still remains. He does not endorse every stupid thing Chip does -- anything he says at this point will come back to HIM -- as it always does -- not to Chip.

You have all been around long enough. You all know how he his comments are always distorted. So while I originally thought he should speak up, I now believe he should do what he thinks is correct -- and that includes -- whether we like it or not -- politically.


This is exactly what I have been saying. This is not Mike Huckabee's battle, it is Chip Saltsman's. Mike is not responsible for every word out of Chip's mouth. I have also said whatever Mike would say will be twisted by the media against him. I too want him to be our next candidate....


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:02 pm 
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No, Mike is not responsible for what Chip says.

But, I don't think it is too much for him to make a statement, as Newt and others have done, saying that this type of thing has no part in the Republican Party. There is no reason in the world that he can't say something like that. And frankly, if there is, maybe I've been wasting my time here for the past year.

I know that there are people who will bash Huck if he says that the song is worng. To some people - eh excuse me, some idiots - you are a "liberal" if you show sensitivity to racial issues. As a matter of fact if you do some really outrageous things like appear before a black audience or vote in Congress to say that lynching was wrong, you're "pandering." Pandering to us liberal race-baiters across the political spectrum.

You know, I actually do know something about the fear of having people talk about you if you do the right thing. Do you know what it's like to be a black person in this country who openly supports the Republican Party? It means ridicule. People talking about you. It's ignorant but at the same time, I understand it. People don't understand how you could have a black mother and father and associate with a party that thinks Rush Limbaugh is its unofficial leader or isn't sure whether or not the "Magic Negro" song is in bad taste.

I had to get talked about in order to make the decisions that I've made so far in who I've supported. My former Bishop was denegrated in the black community when he came out and publicly supported President Bush over John Kerry - as well as when he came out against Barack Obama. People all over the country were calling him an "Uncle Tom." When this past February, in this historic election year, I went to the polling place in my blue state in order to say that I wanted to register temporarily as a Republican in order to vote in the Republican primary - not for Obama - how many stares do you think I got? Once, when I was viewing Huck's Army on my cell phone while getting a haircut, my barber saw the Huckabee/McCain logo and launched a thirty minute lecture to me asking me how in the world I could be thinking about possibly supporting the Republicans.

But I see that it's possible that I've had it all wrong. Maybe I should be afraid of the Rush's in my community. Maybe I should avoid being publicly or privately in favor of the people they disapprove of - after all, that would spare me from getting talked about. Maybe if I did that and just tried to make sure that nobody talked about me and that I had the approval of uninformed people in my sphere, life would be easier. Maybe my mom wouldn't object to me talking about politics during family reunions (I'm sort of unofficially banned from doing it - my voting choices would upset too many people and start too long a conversation).

At some point, you have to not just do the right thing but not be afraid to do it while people who don't agree with you are looking and listening. Mike is an awesome guy and I very much respect him and he has a great reputation for inclusiveness. I also understand that in addition to being a great guy, he is a loyal guy and I don't expect or want him to trash Chip as a person or whatever else. But it's just simply not too much to ask to publicly say that the Republican Party does not tolerate racial division and that this may have been well-intentioned but that it was very inappropriate, has hurt people and given some the wrong impression (I think) of the leadership of the Republican Party.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:24 pm 
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I think too much is being made of Chip's relationship to Mike. Chip is Mike's FORMER campaign manager. There is no association there now, that I know of, other than Chip's relationship to Sarah (she has more or less headed up the online petition to make him RNC chairman). Mike should feel no obligation to defend Chip. But if I were him, I would certainly distance myself from Chip. Chip has shown a huge lack of judgement and any association with the man could possibly hurt a 2012 run.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:31 pm 
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I don't think for one second that Mike has anything to do with Chip's judgment or taste. Mike is a class act, which is why I worked so hard, with everyone else, to try to get him elected.

Mike didn't deserve this. Mike didn't make or distribute the CD and he wouldn't do such a thing.

But Mike, by virtue of his gifts, is a prominent voice in the GOP and, unfortunately, has an association with a person who made this stupid decision. As the leader he is, he should make it clear that the GOP should never be a place for that kind of divisive politics. He's made it clear through his example that he feels this way. But now that this situation has been forced on him, he should also say the same thing now. As should others.

Nobody's talking about hanging Chip out to dry. But maybe even Chip needs to be reminded that we need to be involved in vertical politics and avoid things that both hurt people's feelings (whether we understand it or not) and also distract and unnecessarily take time and attention away from the mission of Faith, Family and Freedom.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:35 pm 
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With all due respect to my fellow HA members, and I sincerely mean that, 'associations' matter.

At least, many of us claimed they did. Does the name Jeremiah Wright mean anything? Or the 'unrepentant terrorist'?

Fair or not, associations are significant. But more than that - and this is the point I think that's being overlooked here - this is not about whether or not Chip Salsman was Mike Huckabee's former campaign manager.

I hear you on this one. Mike is not responsible for every word out of Chip's mouth -nor every gift with his name on it. That's absolutely true.

This isn't about that. Mike is no longer running, Chip is no longer managing.

This is about something else: Mike has endorsed Chip for the position of Republican National Committee chairman. And it is for that job that Chip sent out this CD parody.

The association alone leads to some negative publicity (and it does, like it or not, as Mike's name has been mentioned in every single article I've seen on this) - but would not alone warrant Mike's speaking out.

But the endorsement - and then the association on top of it - does.

The next election is four years away. The next campaign wouldn't start for another two years or more. If we fear Mike's addressing this will hurt him that far in the distance, then we are missing what Mike is all about: Do the Right Thing.

Also - there is starting to be some discussion of this on Huckpac. TVV and tpetersel, I would encourage you to post there, with some of what you've said here. I hate that this 'requires' someone of color, but your voices carry more weight on this. I believe Mike will listen to what you have to say.

Again, I appreciate the tone of this discussion. Each time I check, I sincerely hope this thread will not be locked, but that we continue it in the civil tone that characterizes vertical politics. Know that any disagreement is said with respect :-)


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 3:54 pm 
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ValueVoter: I mean this sincerely - no one has been a truer fan of Mike Huckabee than you. I hope in the end you can find solace with Mike's decision, whatever it is. And I know that you will always support him, because I have seen your loyalty demonstrated so many, many times. My only fear is what the media has done to him in the past -- and what I fear they might do to him in the future to jeopardize his chances. But that is me. I know Mike Huckabee will be true to himself, in the end, whatever the right decision for him is. And I know that all of us will stand behind him because he offers us all so much hope for the future.

Wishing everyone a very Happy New Year.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:00 pm 
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Good points Donna Jean!

Plus, even if Mike wasn't associated with Chip and endorsed him, IMO he should still speak to the issue - that's what it means to be a leader. Once again, we see the GOP suffering with LDD (leadership deficit disorder). All the more reason for a reasonable and compassionate voice like Mike's to be heard.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:07 pm 
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Great points, chap!

Quote:
Know that any disagreement is said with respect


I agree with this as well. We all know that disagreements can get heated sometimes, especially when the topic involves issues close to people's hearts. But that doesn't mean that we shouldn't talk - in fact, we need to talk. A lot. I respect everyone's right to speak their mind - and that also applies to those who feel this issue isn't nothing and that it's all about PC. I totally disagree with that sentiment, but we need to talk, even just to air our disagreements, or else we'll never get anywhere.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:12 pm 
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This story will fade because it's happening in the midst of an Israeli/Hamas conflict , but Chips reputation will be hurt for quite some time.

Yes associations matter, but not always, and it's dependative on the context.

the Wright/Obama connection is far more significant that the Chip/Huckabee connection because Obama looked to Wright for spiritual advice, and sat under hateful speeches for years. Chip/Huckabee's association matters less because Huckabee was helped by him for ....campaign advice....not public policy, not moral issues, not spiritual advice, etc.etc.

Huckabee is always free to "rescind" his endorsement if he so chooses (the endorsement of Chip was over handling the RNC as chair, not of any moral, social, issue etc.etc.).

That is up to Mike, it would be unfair to hold Mike responsible for any or all actions Chip will make in the future. Even if this CD thing had not happened, you could not tie all of Chips actions as (possible) future chair on Mike.

I think the people know this, I am not worried.

However, that is his choice,

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:31 pm 
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I have been following this thread but have not yet commented until now. Some members of The Iowa Brigade have exchanged some emails about it, and their responses along with the ones here have kind of cleared up how I feel about the whole thing. (I sure do appreciate civil debates with like-minded people who are working to achieve the same goals). I will just share one of my emails to my fellow Iowa people.

Quote:
Yes, I agree that there are many reasons why this was dumb and insensitive. But my only problem is that the right (from politicians to talking heads) did many dumb and insensitive things when it came to Obama (which I believe turned off voters and sent them into Obama's arms) during the entire campaign (Mike is one of the few Republicans who went after Obama on issues only) and now it seems like Chip is taking the brunt of all of the GOP's irrational campaign against Obama. Just my assessment of why it is sad to see one man die when there are many to blame.

Republicans should have stood up against this type of stuff long before Chip Saltsman sent the CD and Mike was one of the few who did.


I have no idea what Huckabee will do. I do agree with those on here who say that he cannot fight every battle. There is something else that comes to mind, though. I can't remember what interview it was, but Mike was asked about his lacking endorsements from the evangelical community and Hagee and some other pastor with controversial comments were brought up. Mike was asked if he would have even wanted those endorsements. Mike replied that he was not in any position to turn down endorsements, and he added that just because someone made a controversial or wrong statement that doesn't mean that it wipes out the good things the person has done. Mike did not agree with Hagee's view of Catholics, but he recognized the positives of Hagee that overshadowed the negative. He may feel the same way about Chip. The question is whether or not he will address it.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:48 pm 
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That's a good point, IowansRock!

They're talking about this on CNN right now. I'm sure somebody at the DNC is jumping up and down right now. "We won 2012!! All we need is one or two more states!!! Go Rush!!!"

Not going away.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:49 pm 
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from NRO, Jim Geraghty:

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Monday, December 29, 2008

BARACK OBAMA, HORSERACE

You Can Explain a Joke, but You Can't Save It

Over the Christmas break, the race for Republican National Committee chair experienced its second racially tinged controversy, when news broke that Chip Saltsman sent RNC members a CD of parody artist Paul Shanklin that included the song “Barack the Magic Negro,” sung to the tune of “Puff the Magic Dragon.”

One can explain a joke, but one can’t save it. Yes, in the song, Shanklin is imitating a jealous Al Sharpton denouncing Obama as inauthentic, and the title is inspired by the Hollywood’s late-1990s obsession with depicting mystically or spiritually attuned African-American characters who suddenly appear on the horizon to nurture the moral development of white protagonists — Lawrence Fishburne in The Matrix, Will Smith in The Legend of Bagger Vance, Don Cheadle in The Family Man, Michael Clarke Duncan in The Green Mile, almost any character played by Morgan Freeman. (Lyrics to the song can be found here.)

And yes, it’s strange to see the term “negro” suddenly almost as leaden with moral risk as the other n-word, and we need not be reminded that the United Negro College Fund retains its original name (although the term rarely appears on the web site of the organization, identified mostly as UNCF).

"Negro" is, if not offensive, archaic. The use of the term in the title and chorus detracts from the point of the song, which is Sharpton’s jealousy, and/or the perception that Obama is portrayed in the vein of all of those Hollywood characters — mysterious, appearing on the horizon, attuned to deep spiritual truths and offering a seemingly magical healing touch.

The counterargument rolled out by Saltsman — it’s a satire — seems insufficient to the moment.

If you want to win over African-American voters to your party, perhaps the first step is to figure out why the title “Barack the Magic Negro” would offend them. Few would be offended by a song called “Barack the Magic Chicagoan” or “Barack the Magic Politician”; the use of the term “negro” specifically identifies him by his skin color, which makes it appear that his skin color is what’s being held up for ridicule, not the perception that he’s magical. It's easy to see a song that appears to be mocking someone for his skin color as inconsistent with judging people by the content of their character.

If you’re going to send a gift to all RNC members, that gift is going to say a lot about you. I had said about Katon Dawson that the measure of a man is more than his country club membership; the measure of Chip Saltsman is a lot more than a song on a CD he sent as a Christmas gift. But this is an entirely unforced error, giving those who wish to portray the GOP as racially insensitive a cheap and easy example to add to their arsenal.

UPDATE: Several readers write in point out that the song was inspired by an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times. Yes, I know, that's why the link above on the word "obsession" takes you to that op-ed.

12/29 09:12 AM

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:50 pm 
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Duncan got praised for condemning the song.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:53 pm 
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from the Daily Beast:
http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2008-12-29/the-magic-negro-debacle/

Quote:
The 'Magic Negro' Debacle
by John Avlon
December 29, 2008 | 10:41am


In the era of Obama, the GOP’s tone deafness on race could ultimately destroy the party.

Would-be RNC Chair Chip Saltsman's decision to send out a Christmas CD to GOP committee-members featuring a song calling our President-elect "Barack the Magic Negro" is the just latest sign of Republicans' tone deafness when it comes to race. It's a problem that has led directly to the pathetic lack of diversity on its political bench and underscores the party's long-term challenge of regaining relevance in the Age of Obama.

There’s a reason the Republicans have pathetic lack of diversity on their political bench.

Saltsman presumably did not intend to offend by mailing out the parody CD by Paul Shanklin with songs that first aired during the campaign on Rush Limbaugh's radio show. A look at the lyrics shows that the song's real target is the Al Sharpton-sound-alike singer who feels that Obama has usurped his rightful place as the protest leader of African-American politics. But now that Obama has been elected the president of all Americans, and Saltsman is attempting to run for leader of the opposition party, the song—whose title comes from a Los Angeles Times column—could not help but become a lightning rod. The failure to anticipate the outrage points to the blinders that exist in racially homogenous Republican backrooms. Conservatives who take good ol' boy pride in being politically incorrect are either unaware or don't care that they come off as being somewhere between indifferent and hostile to the full diversity of American life.

But ultimately, this is not a problem of political perception—it is rooted in the Republican Party's electoral strategy over the past four decades.

Republicans rightly take pride in calling themselves "the Party of Lincoln." It's sometimes easy to forget that Lincoln was the first Republican president, and that his promise to preserve the Union, even by ending slavery, caused the South to secede after his election in 1860. People who lose wars have long memories and the (white) South voted straight Democrat for 100 years.

But when Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act over southern conservative objections—whispering to his press secretary Bill Moyers, "I just gave the South to the Republicans for your lifetime and mine"—some Republicans smelled electoral opportunity. Conservative icons Ronald Reagan and Barry Goldwater opposed the Civil Rights Act on the grounds that it was an unconstitutional infringement on state's rights and freedom of association. These men were not racists, but they gave some racists the cover of political legitimacy in a new party. Mississippi returned the favor by casting 87 percent of its votes in 1964 for Goldwater—the first time the state had voted Republican in its history. Soon, the entire red/blue map was reversed.

This southern strategy may have sold the Party of Lincoln's soul, but it contributed to four-decades of political gain. Between 1968 and 2004, Republicans won seven of 10 presidential elections. Before 1968, the opposite was true—Democrats won seven of 10.

Now the bill for this Faustian bargain has come due. Demographics are destiny and America is becoming less white and rural, and more diverse and urban.

Barack Obama's historic victory changed old political dividing lines, winning states that hadn't voted for a Democrat since 1964, like Virginia and Indiana. While Obama played offense, making inroads into virtually every major demographic group—and winning swing voters decisively—the McCain-Palin ticket increased its vote totals only in a narrow band of districts stretching from Appalachia to Oklahoma, and demographically winning decisively only voters over age 60 and towns with populations under 50,000. The costs of preaching to a shrinking base of what Palin characterized as "real Americans" will only become more apparent in the future.

Here's a telling snapshot: of the 43 African-Americans in the departing 110th Congress, all are Democrats. Of 30 Hispanics, 24 are Democrats. And of the 89 women serving in Congress, 64 are Democrats. The lone openly gay Republican member of Congress, Arizona's Jim Kolbe, quietly left office in 2006.

The recent election of the first Vietnamese-American in Congress, Louisiana Republican Joseph Cao, is a welcome step in the right direction of diversity. But the fact that the first African-American senator and the first female senator freely elected to the Senate were both Republicans—Ed Brooke of Massachusetts and Margaret Chase Smith of Maine—has been reduced to near-rumor and it’s questionable whether either of them would have felt comfortable in the Republican Party of today.

While George W. Bush ran on a platform of compassionate conservatism that implied increased minority recruitment, and appointed our first two African-American secretaries of state, the party lost ground not only in terms of elected ethnic but geographic diversity. After the play-to-the-base politics of the Bush-DeLay years, not a single Republican representative is left in all of New England, while the third-way Republican mayors of the 1990s have all but disappeared.

And the Bush administration's hopes to bring Hispanics into their fold faded when the immigration reform backed by Bush and McCain went down in flames in the face of opposition from the Rush Limbaughs, Tom Tancredos, and Mitt Romneys of the party.

Against this backdrop, compounded by Colin Powell's endorsement of Obama, it’s no wonder that some Republicans are waking up to the diversity deficit the GOP faces on all fronts. Amid Saltsman's competitors for RNC Chair are not one but two African-Americans—former Maryland Lieutenant Gov. Michael Steele and former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell. (Blackwell has dismissed the CD controversy, saying that it is a matter of "hyper-sensitivity.") Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is the alone among possible 2012 candidates who can turn the page and give a more diverse face to the GOP at the top of the ticket.

But such Hail Mary passes can't be expected to undo decades of damage overnight. The GOP must deploy its own version of the 50-state strategy and consistently recruit minority candidates. The idea of an Urban Republican should no longer sound like an oxymoron or an entry on the Endangered Species list.

Obama won in large part because he appealed to the better angels of our nature, and himself looks like America in the 21st century. Republicans need to respond with something better than cynicism or sarcasm. They need to rediscover their founding ideals, confront the ghosts of their past, and present a party that looks like America to regain credibility as The Party of Lincoln.

John P. Avlon is the author of Independent Nation: How Centrists Can Change American Politics. Avlon also served as Director of Speechwriting and Deputy Director of Policy for Rudy Giuliani's Presidential Campaign. Previously, he was a columnist for the New York Sun and served as Chief Speechwriter and Deputy Communications Director for Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. He worked on Bill Clinton's 1996 presidential campaign.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 5:01 pm 
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http://hotair.com/archives/2008/12/29/the-obligatory-barack-the-magic-negro-controversy-post/
Now Hotair has it on the thread where people can comment, including a poll people can vote on:
Quote:
The Obligatory Barack the magic negro post:
posted at 3:03 pm on December 29, 2008 by Allahpundit

Tapper reminds us of the song’s genesis in a lefty LA Times op-ed about conventions of authenticity, which the lyrics parody, and The One’s good humor in laughing it off when asked about it last year (“I don’t mind folks poking fun at me”). Which leaves us with a tediously predictable debate: If the song’s not clearly racist, should Chip Saltsman be scolded for circulating it? Some righties say yes, since we know what the media will do with it and how that’ll affect voter perceptions of the GOP; others say no, that they’ll be damned before they let the left set the parameters for what’s politically correct. Count me in the former group with Geraghty and John Avlon. There are perhaps principles so important that it’s worth risking the party’s viability to defend them — strong borders, an end to bailoutmania — but the use of an archaic term like “Negro” that’s disfavored by blacks doesn’t strike me as one of them. If you disagree and think the real principle here is resisting an ever-expanding Orwellian universe of “unacceptable” terms, fair enough. But be prepared to divert party resources from other business to try to convince blacks that they shouldn’t feel uneasy about words that cause them unease.

All while trying to expand the tent, of course.

Avlon:

Quote:
Saltsman presumably did not intend to offend by mailing out the parody CD by Paul Shanklin with songs that first aired during the campaign on Rush Limbaugh’s radio show. A look at the lyrics shows that the song’s real target is the Al Sharpton-sound-alike singer who feels that Obama has usurped his rightful place as the protest leader of African-American politics. But now that Obama has been elected the president of all Americans, and Saltsman is attempting to run for leader of the opposition party, the song—whose title comes from a Los Angeles Times column—could not help but become a lightning rod. The failure to anticipate the outrage points to the blinders that exist in racially homogenous Republican backrooms. Conservatives who take good ol’ boy pride in being politically incorrect are either unaware or don’t care that they come off as being somewhere between indifferent and hostile to the full diversity of American life…

Obama won in large part because he appealed to the better angels of our nature, and himself looks like America in the 21st century. Republicans need to respond with something better than cynicism or sarcasm. They need to rediscover their founding ideals, confront the ghosts of their past, and present a party that looks like America to regain credibility as The Party of Lincoln.


Most candidates for RNC chair have gone the pragmatic route, as has Newt Gingrich. But Ken Blackwell, leveraging his own Absolute Moral Authority, cannily absolved Saltsman. If this “scandal” gets big enough, I wonder if the RNC won’t try to defuse it by making him chair. Exit invitation: Vote it out!
Saltsman and the "Magic Negro":


*Stupid unforced error
*Welcome PC pushback

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 5:07 pm 
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http://www.politico.com/blogs/bensmith/
from Politico: Crist weighs in:

Crist's positioning

Quote:
Charlie Crist has, in the wake of the election, cast himself as a leader of the modernizing, more diverse Republican Party, and seems to be weighing in indirectly, via a statement from his state party chairman, Jim Greer, on the Saltsman flap:

As the GOP Chairman in one of our nation’s most ethnically and culturally diverse states, I am especially disappointed by the inappropriate words and actions we’ve seen over the past few days. I am proud of those party leaders who have stood up in firm opposition to this type of behavior.

In Florida we have worked hard to reach out to ALL citizens to promote the Republican Party’s principles and values while ensuring that our commitment to African Americans, Hispanics, and other minority communities is sincere and credible. Actions such as the distribution of this CD, regardless of intent, only serves to promote divisiveness and distracts us from our common goal of building our party.

Today, the GOP has an unprecedented opportunity to embrace change and inclusion, and we are either going to welcome this opportunity fully or watch it slip through our fingers. We can only achieve success if Republican leaders reject racial or any other acts that divide us and instead embrace what unites us as a nation.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 5:49 pm 
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Just saw this posted over on Huck PAC:
Hello Team Huck PAC-

Chip should have been more careful in his selection of Christmas gifts, but no one who knows him would ever suggest that he in any way would purposely disparage other people. Chip knows how sensitive such issues are. It shouldn’t be the main factor in the RNC race.

The election of Barack Obama is not only historic for our country but it is something all Americans, not just Democrats, should celebrate. As I have said many times the election of Mr. Obama is significant not because of his race or in spite of it, but with indifference to it. He was not my choice for President, but he will be MY President over the next four years and I will support him personally and pray for his success. I will certainly disagree with him at times, but I pledge that my disagreements with him will be over his policy decisions and not aimed at him personally. I ask that all of you will join with me in doing that.

Faithfully,

Mike Huckabee


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 6:06 pm 
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I am glad to see this statement from Mike. This is basically what I was hoping and expecting from him.

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