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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 7:35 pm 
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[repeat_until_there_are_no_blacks_left_in_america_who_support_the_gop]
Sadly, this type of thing happens with someone who is affiliated with the GOP every couple of months or so. I could set my watch by it (the next "regrettable incident" is due in September sometime). Just in case people still wonder why so many people view the Republican Party as racist ... it's not just because this type of thing happens but because it keeps happening ... and happening .. and happening ...
[/repeat_until_there_are_no_blacks_left_in_america_who_support_the_gop]

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http://www.tennessean.com/article/20090616/NEWS0201/906160323/1009/NEWS01/GOP+aide+rebuked+for+racist+e-mail
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An aide in the state Senate has been reprimanded for an offensive e-mail regarding President Barack Obama sent from a statehouse account.

Sherri Goforth, an aide to Sen. Diane Black, R-Gallatin, was issued a verbal and written rebuke for forwarding a picture that made light of Obama's race to other staffers.

Goforth had made "a bad decision" but would not be disciplined further because she understands the gravity of sending insensitive e-mails, Black said.

"This correspondence was done without my knowledge, and it does not reflect my views," Black said Monday. "It really doesn't matter to me why it was sent — whether it was a mistake or a decision — it won't be tolerated."

Black said she reprimanded Goforth on the same day that the e-mail was sent. Black's office said Monday that Goforth, who is white, had left for the day.

The message, which went out May 28, shows portraits of the nation's 44 presidents. Obama is depicted as a black box with only a pair of cartoonish white eyes visible.

Copies of the e-mail were posted on the Internet Monday.

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Chip Forrester said Monday he thought Goforth ought to be fired.

"I am calling on Sen. Black to reject this racist smear and fire this staffer who, on state government time, on state government computers, using a state government email account, launched this bigoted attack on our president," Forrester said in a statement.

Rep. John DeBerry, the chairman of the Tennessee Black Caucus of State Legislators, said Goforth's e-mail reflects poorly on Tennessee and lawmakers. He said such incidents hinder race relations.

"It's unfortunate, and it's another in a series of unfortunate incidents that have happened across this country with this president," he said. "It sends the wrong message from the state of Tennessee, and it sends the wrong message from the House and Senate. I wish it hadn't happened."

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 7:49 pm 
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What is wrong with people? That person should be fired and have no part in politics again.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 8:49 pm 
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She hit a triple; tacky, immoral, and stupid. Geesh. This stuff makes a flake like Jeanne Garofalo look reasonable.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 9:15 pm 
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Who would want to keep someone like this on as an aide? They are a major liability not to mention their needs to be consequences for bad actions.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 9:30 pm 
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This type of behavior is wrong but isn't limited to the GOP. It just doesn't get reported when a "D" is after the name.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 9:40 pm 
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conservativevoter wrote:
This type of behavior is wrong but isn't limited to the GOP. It just doesn't get reported when a "D" is after the name.


Agreed. I strongly suspect there were more than a few Obama voters who used the "N-word" when describing who they were gonna voter for.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 11:27 pm 
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VertiCon wrote:
conservativevoter wrote:
This type of behavior is wrong but isn't limited to the GOP. It just doesn't get reported when a "D" is after the name.


Agreed. I strongly suspect there were more than a few Obama voters who used the "N-word" when describing who they were gonna voter for.


I'm sure you're right that people on both sides do it. It's just that it seems like a Democrat somewhere does something stupid like this every couple of years and a Republican does something stupid like this every couple of months. That's my honest perspective. Just in the past couple of months, I remember the "Obama Waffles" at the Values Voter summit (http://forum.hucksarmy.com/viewtopic.php?f=138&t=15631&p=130387&hilit=obama+waffles#p130387), Congressman Westmoreland calling Obama and his wife "uppity" and refusing to apologize (http://forum.hucksarmy.com/viewtopic.php?f=141&t=15435&hilit=uppity), the joke about the first family being "another black family living in government housing" (http://forum.hucksarmy.com/viewtopic.php?f=141&t=18024&hilit=government+housing+palin), and of course the "Magic Negro." I won't even mention the Tee shirt that shows the Democratic Donkey in the sight of a rifle with "Got Ammo" on it and the jokes about whether the White House could be called white anymore, which somehow floated about in Republican circles last year.

There are idiots in both parties. But even mentioning that reminds me of a conversation I had with my wife when she cautioned me about eating too much pizza. I said "honey, even Denzel Washington eats a lot of pizza."

But Denzel Washington doesn't have a gut. I do. He can afford to eat pizza. I can't.

The Democrats aren't seen as a racist party anymore. The Republicans are. And the GOP can't afford for things like this to keep happening. It doesn't really matter what the Democrats occasionally do. They can afford it nowadays but the GOP can't.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2009 11:31 pm 
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Cnn Interview with Sen. Diane Black

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 12:10 am 
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I get frustrated when conservatives believe lies/exaggerations about Republicans spread by the liberal media and Democrats.

However, I get even more frustrated when conservative talking heads like Rush and Hannity act as if the media bias against them gives them the right to make inflammatory comments and then complain about the double standard. Sure, they can afford it because it gets them ratings and because they're not running for public office...but it certainly doesn't help the conservative image.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 10:42 pm 
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Quote:
VertiCon wrote:
...I strongly suspect there were more than a few Obama voters who used the "N-word" when describing who they were gonna voter for.


TheValuesVoter wrote:
I'm sure you're right that people on both sides do it. It's just that it seems like a Democrat somewhere does something stupid like this every couple of years and a Republican does something stupid like this every couple of months. That's my honest perspective...


I agree completely with you. However, lemme clarify what I was trying to suggest. Probably the Democrats have mostly weeded out (in one way or another) the professional politicians who have loose lips for racially insensitive banter.

Whereas, the Republicans have desperately worked on another project, which is to form an electoral coalition amongst many sorts of non_liberal peoples. And, thus have not concerned themselves with political correctness testing of their rising proteges, the way that the Democrat gatekeepers have.

Obviously, I'm not saying all conservatives are racist (or even racially insensitive) because that would to accuse everyone here of being racist (including myself!).

(It is also worth noting another intimate factor of the politics of left and right. Conservatism, as a movement {as opposed to vague conservatism in the culture} is mostly been about ideas, whereas liberalism, in large part, has been about identity politics, i.e the apparent primary motivation behind Sotomayor pick, whereas Judge Bork's whiteness was as irrelevant to his selection as his naturally fuzzy hair.)

Anyway, since the civil rights movement its been those on the conservative side who have most visually struggled with what they saw as radical change in the status quo of normal American society.

Ironically, even though the civil rights movement was viewed by many citizens as radical, it was really only correcting an anomaly in the civil order -- and aligning the laws with the spirit of the Constitution.

But, the civil rights movement had the unfortunate historical accident of being co-incident with the anti_war movement, the feminist movement, and the free-love/hippie/drug-culture phenomena. Thus, its easy for persons who aren't used to thinking deeply and carefully about important political issues to view the civil rights movement as simply one aspect of the larger mess of wholesale societal breakdown so vividly demonstrated in the 1960s.

Moreover, family breakdown and exploding crime in predominately black neighborhoods have served to reinforce negative stereotypes about black folk amongst already suspicious and prejudicial peoples.

They can say, 'well... if racial discrimination has caused the social maladies in the black community, then how's come black families were mostly intact prior to the "civil rights movement', but began to disintegrate rapidly subsequently to it, and likewise black crime has exploded since the advent of the civil rights movement? What's up with that?'

My suspicion is that people who wonder such things are partially right, but horribly wrong in one aspect.

If... they think that it is the inherent inferiority of the persons of African descent which is the cause of these maladies, and that blacks-unrestrained can't behave in a civil society, then they are just as wrong as they can be.

But, I think blacks suffered more than any of us in the milieu of the social upheaval of the 1960s. And, I agree with the case you have been making about the harm caused by the Republican party in the 1960s with their intentional write off of the blackvote, and black citizens generally.

It was to play "identity politics" of another sort. It wasn't to allow that black people, just as white people, can and do have diverse political views. But, simply presume them a monolith, like organized labor. (It turns out Reagan busted the idea that people in unions all think alike.)

What I was referring to is I've witnessed on numerous occasions "working class" folks who vote Democrat because their unions tell them to, or because they just accept the old conventional wisdom that Republicans are for the "rich man", and the Democrats are for the "common man", but who are otherwise racially bigoted. They reason if an "N" is gonna increase their paycheck then they can vote for an "N".

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 1:10 am 
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I am a white woman, raised in almost completely white neighborhoods in the north. I remember our family visiting the new (black) family across the street one evening in 1969, the parents having coffee on the back steps and we kids playing. Good messages, few opportunities.

Since 1980 I have lived in North Carolina. I have had two startling clashes with racism. The first was when I was working at a preschool: I was from the North; I was white; and I was working on my graduate degree. The hostility against me was open and palpable. It was nasty.

The second example is more recent, and shocking, though it will not be to you, TW: it was at the 2008 Republican election night gathering in our town. I was sitting with two white "Christian" women in the hotel ballroom. A black woman server was clearing glassware from our table, and she took the empty glass from in front of one of the women. The woman snatched it back, and muttered that she would need that. Then before the server was very far off, she said, "We are going to be serving THEM before you know it!"

I was shocked! I have never in my entire life (never mind how long, but long enough) heard anything like that. And said almost certainly in the person's hearing too! I was mortified to be remotely associated with this woman. She had me in her debt (she had kindly bought my daughters some dinner when there was no food, as had been advertised, and I was unable to), so I was at a bit of loss as to how to react; I ducked my head and "searched" in my purse for awhile to hide my anger. I felt later that I should have spoken up. I'm sorry I did not, now.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 18, 2009 2:13 am 
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Sen. Diane Black (ironic name) should have FIRED that aide on the spot. THAT is what it means when someone says that behavior "won't be tolerated." As long as the so-called aide still has her job, then racist e-mails ARE being tolerated.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 7:09 am 
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ndcooper1 wrote:
I am a white woman, raised in almost completely white neighborhoods in the north. I remember our family visiting the new (black) family across the street one evening in 1969, the parents having coffee on the back steps and we kids playing. Good messages, few opportunities.

Since 1980 I have lived in North Carolina. I have had two startling clashes with racism. The first was when I was working at a preschool: I was from the North; I was white; and I was working on my graduate degree. The hostility against me was open and palpable. It was nasty.

The second example is more recent, and shocking, though it will not be to you, TW: it was at the 2008 Republican election night gathering in our town. I was sitting with two white "Christian" women in the hotel ballroom. A black woman server was clearing glassware from our table, and she took the empty glass from in front of one of the women. The woman snatched it back, and muttered that she would need that. Then before the server was very far off, she said, "We are going to be serving THEM before you know it!"

I was shocked! I have never in my entire life (never mind how long, but long enough) heard anything like that. And said almost certainly in the person's hearing too! I was mortified to be remotely associated with this woman. She had me in her debt (she had kindly bought my daughters some dinner when there was no food, as had been advertised, and I was unable to), so I was at a bit of loss as to how to react; I ducked my head and "searched" in my purse for awhile to hide my anger. I felt later that I should have spoken up. I'm sorry I did not, now.


We've all been in situations in which we could have spoken up during a situation in which someone is openly sinning. The important thing is to focus on speaking up in the future.

Racism - in all directions - has been a "national sin" that has affected generations of Americans and still lingers in the hearts of too many people today. So, sadly, neither of the two situations that you cited really surprises me - there are people like that in the world and in the country. I think that the key with this "national sin" that some people of all backgrounds are guilty of is to avoid the trap of the the sin that so easily entangles and keep showing God's love, even in the face of a few people's hatred. Racial resentments in this country is not just a simple sin but is sin compounded by history and often passed down from generation to generation. It's also easy to get entangled in the sin by being exposed to the hatred of others toward us and developing resentment ourselves.

This is the greatest country in the world today. But one of the most effective attacks that satan has ever launched against this great country was to convince people to hate and resent each other because of ethnicity. This country spent an incredible amount of its treasure not only in trading human beings as property but, for a hundred years afterward, maintaining the cost of a psudo-dual infrastructure (schools, bathrooms, stores, etc.). How dumb was that? How much of our debt as a nation today results from the fact that in many parts of our nation, we were building two of everything? How much further behind is our work force today in part because for centuries, we did not allow everyone access to an education and used to systematically deny people the ability to learn to read? The residual effects of those sins still affect this country in incalculable ways today. And from a spiritual perspective, as a direct result of our sinful past, we still tend to self-segregate in terms of worship today. I can't think of a too many more effective ways of diluting the power of corporate prayer of believers than having all the believers scattered around different congregations based on skin color largely because that's the way it's been for a couple of hundred years.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 12:10 pm 
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All-in-for-Mike wrote:
Sen. Diane Black (ironic name) should have FIRED that aide on the spot. THAT is what it means when someone says that behavior "won't be tolerated." As long as the so-called aide still has her job, then racist e-mails ARE being tolerated.


In the interview, Sen. Black said she immediately called the HR dept to see what she could do and the did as they recommended. If she had immediately fired her, there might have been cause for litigation assuming the aide's record had been exemplary up until the incident.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 12:25 pm 
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Racial resentments in this country is not just a simple sin but is sin compounded by history and often passed down from generation to generation. It's also easy to get entangled in the sin by being exposed to the hatred of others toward us and developing resentment ourselves.


Last week I worked at a youth camp. Mostly white with some Laotian, Hispanic, Native American, Black, etc.

This year, we had a young black man, teaching the boys. The last day of camp he spoke about his experience. He was from the 2nd largest city in our state. The camp was in a rural area. When asked to come and teach his reaction was: "You want me to go teach, where?? In what county?"

He then went on to say how much he appreciated the opportunity to teach and how welcome he had been made to feel. And also, that he had made the trip every day and survived.

Apparently this particular county has a reputation of being unfriendly to blacks. I was of course grateful for the testimony, but also offended in some small way that there are many blacks who consider my family and others racist simply because of where we live. I'm also offended that I'm considered racist because of who I vote for - or don't vote for.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2009 1:52 pm 
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I understand what you are saying, Polly, but I would try not to be if I were you. We are judged by the company we keep, and that's true even if the company we keep is beyond our control.

My wife and I were talking about this last night. I got an email forward from a friend that had a "The Good Wife's Guide" in it that was supposedly written back in the '50s. Now, chances are it is a fabrication, but certainly, women were treated as far less than equal than men just last generation here in America. Consider, for instance, the Home Economics Story (see video below).

Between the way women and men were treated, it isn't at all suprising that white males are treated as the source of all social evils. The problem, of course, is that you can't fix past wrongs by inflicting further wrongs on a new generation, but regardless, it is going to take a lot of time to make up for it. Those of us whose parents honestly did oppress another group need to have a good sense of balance in refusing to let others blame us for their problems while at the same time being sensative to their lack of trust.

Again, I'm not trying to justify reverse racism or say that we are responsible. What I am saying is that it is human nature to be suspicious of a group of people who have had, or do have, a reputation for hating you, and so all I'm saying is, for your own sake, rather than being offended, try to be understanding (both of their position and the rational limits of your sympathy).


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 2:28 am 
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TheValuesVoter wrote:
We've all been in situations in which we could have spoken up during a situation in which someone is openly sinning.

Agreed.

Confession:

I have a self-disappointment personal experience. I did something radical --partly to avoid doing the courageous thing.

I have a longtime friend (whom I haven't had any extended contact with for about six years).

Thirteen years ago I (and my family) moved to a neighboring state --some three-plus hours away from where we used to live. One of the top reasons (though not the only one) was the worry about the effect this friend would have on my young children (the other fear was the effect on my children of the their father tolerating his friend).

My friend (whom I came to know in high school -- through common interests: sports, music, girls, and ordinary teenage concerns) had grown up to be comfortable with the "N" word (and, also the "F" word) -- though his mother would scold him for using it, but evidently his father was quite comfortable with it (his parents were divorced).

I would shake my head when he would blurt these things out (sometimes exclaiming his name in embarrassment --which only amused him). I felt a psychological dilemma about how else to respond. Which is to say, I didn't want him to feel I was preaching to him, but I didn't like what I was hearing.

So, not wanting my children to be mentally contaminated and confused by my friend, and... not wanting my children to see their father as a hypocrite, or a coward; we moved (and didn't share every reason why with them). Now, there were other reasons to move, but this one helped tip the scale.

To my shame, I suspect that my friend thinks we just grew apart (which we did). But, sorry to say, he never really knew I could no longer abide his open expression of racial bigotry. :(

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 2:34 am 
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Oddly enough, my friend (in the previous post) and I, went to the same church in our youth. And, this was an all white church in the mid-west, led by transplanted southerners.

And, more than one of the leaders in the church also had negative feelings toward black folk --sometimes subtle; sometimes not. (This puzzled me deeply as 17 year old in the late 70s, because even then I didn't think God had any racial prejudice.) :shrug:

This was an evangelistic church that emphasized door-to-door visits. And, one particularly disturbing event was when the Christian school principal, and myself, went out visiting folks at their homes who were on stacks of 3x5 visitor's cards.

One lady, on our list of visits, lived in the "black section" of town (in this medium sized city) and when we reached her home (after dark) the principal asked me if I would go up and do this one while he waited in the car. (I thought this odd, because the custom was always to go to the homes in pairs.)

I went to the door and knocked, and a sweet little old black lady (probably in her 70s) answered. I said I was visiting from such-n-such Church, and had noticed that she had been there sometime back and had filled out a visitor card, and I wanted to extend an invitation to her to come again. She thanked me and I was on my way. When I got into the principal's car, he said, well that was the last one, and he was glad because he wanted to get out of there (that area).

This stunned me. I said, aren't we supposed to bring the gospel to "all" people? He said (something to the effect), he did believe these people should hear the gospel, he just thought it was better if they stayed in their churches, and we in ours.

Even though this was a man I was taught to respect, I felt an immediate psychological distance from a "Christian leader" who could think in such terms, which seemed to me to be at such odds with the love of Christ, and the emphasis on the "Great Commission", both so often cited in preaching in that church.

I eventually left that church, and the "movement" (and/or denominational orientation) both for this reason, and theological change in me.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2009 9:29 am 
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Polly A wrote:
Quote:
Racial resentments in this country is not just a simple sin but is sin compounded by history and often passed down from generation to generation. It's also easy to get entangled in the sin by being exposed to the hatred of others toward us and developing resentment ourselves.


Last week I worked at a youth camp. Mostly white with some Laotian, Hispanic, Native American, Black, etc.

This year, we had a young black man, teaching the boys. The last day of camp he spoke about his experience. He was from the 2nd largest city in our state. The camp was in a rural area. When asked to come and teach his reaction was: "You want me to go teach, where?? In what county?"

He then went on to say how much he appreciated the opportunity to teach and how welcome he had been made to feel. And also, that he had made the trip every day and survived.

Apparently this particular county has a reputation of being unfriendly to blacks. I was of course grateful for the testimony, but also offended in some small way that there are many blacks who consider my family and others racist simply because of where we live. I'm also offended that I'm considered racist because of who I vote for - or don't vote for.


I think this has been a great dialogue.

I can totally understand how you would be offended that people who don't even know you would consider both you and your neighbors - as a group - to be racists just because you live in a certain place. That's a bad feeling - having someone make certain decisions about you just because of some attribute of you (in your case, your zip code) that has nothing to do with your character.

For the record, I have often felt the same sense of apprehension about some places. I have to confess, when my wife and I went on a road trip a couple of years ago, seeing the "Welcome To Mississippi" sign as well as the segment where we drove through Vidor, Texas (which has been known even in recent times as a "Sundown Town" - meaning, don't let the sun fall down on you there if you're black) were moments that made me tense. Was it fair? No. There are a lot of extremely good people everywhere. But because of a lot of bad things that happened not that long ago in places like these, I did have a sense of apprehension. To be fair, I had the same apprehension later in that long road trip where we were driving on a freeway near Compton, California (a place made famous by Gangster Rappers) - another place with a bad association - even though there are also a lot of good people there.

I will say this. A lot of the nicest, most sincere and most hospitible people I've ever met have been from places in the deep south. So, the more I've gotten to know more people from more places, the less apprehension I've felt. My family goes camping from time to time and for some reason, we're always the only black family at the camp site (I don't know why ... I guess I'm the Tiger Woods of camping). A lot of our camping has been in the south. The people have been beyond nice - extremely good folks. Both my wife and I grew up having best friends who happened to be white; my wife grew up in a congregation in which her family were the only blacks in the church. It's not like we're not comfortable being the only blacks in a group of people. But, to a lot of people, the notion of a black family going into the woods, in the country, in the south, in a place where there are no blacks, in a state with a not-too-distant history of brutal racially-motivated violence, is an idea that makes them afraid (just like, to some people, being the only whites walking through a black working-class neighborhood after dark might make them uncomfortable). It's not fair. But it's the way people are conditioned to think. But these ignorant preconceptions get knocked down when people get to know each other and learn that their preconceptions are wrong.

And so, after my experiences of driving through Mississippi, camping in southern towns, and so forth, I have learned some things that challenge my preconceptions. I've learned that you really can't judge people based on where they live - something I knew academically but now know experientially. I've learned that some of the most friendly and kind people in America are from rural small towns. I've also learned, on the other side and from other experiences, that a lot of people who live in the most dreaded, crime-ridden parts of America's cities are just as good, law-abiding and hard working as the rest of us who don't. They, like those who live not too far from "Sundown Towns" are often good people whose place of residence is given noteriety by a relatively small number of knuckleheads who make people have a bad opinion of the place as a whole.

And I'll bet that that camp counselor has a different opinion now as well. It may have hurt to hear that he was fearful of coming to your part of your state. But I'll bet that from his positive experience meeting nice people like you and the others there, he won't have the same trepidation in the future. The personal experience of being there has knocked down his preconceptions. He's less inclinded now to judge people based on where they live than he was before hand.

The main point: the more people get to know other people, the less they're likely to make decisions about people based on attributes about them - their skin color. Their age. Their state or zip code. Whether or not they have "an accent." The more people get to know other people, the less likely they are to be prejudiced against other people.

I know what it feels like to have people judge me based on attributes. It does hurt and it does cause offense. But the important thing is to not allow it to devolve against bitterness, because you yourself and your friendliness might help to destroy that very same prejudice that offends you.

Not only am I black, but I'm a guy and I'm still relatively young. Those three attributes - the date my parents conceived me, my ancestry, and my gender - three attributes that I had no control over at all - are the three attributes that make me a young black man. Which to many people, is something to be feared. I remember during my first job, whenever I would walk down the hallway, there was an older lady who would literally cringe in fear whenever we passed each other (I guess she thought I was going to do a drive-by on my way to the fax machine). Being falsely accused or judged just because of something about you, unrelated to your character is a bad feeling and I understand you being offended. But, it's important to avoid the temptation to be bitter and instead understand that the people you touch are less likely to carry the same ignorance around after they've met you.

Don't be overcome with evil but overcome evil with good.

_________________
The Values Voter
http://thevaluesvoter.spaces.live.com


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